Materials & Resources (LEED MR Category)

This category addresses those areas of Green Construction that most people are familiar with.  Bamboo flooring, low VOC paints, locally-source materials:  these are the mainstays of environmentally friendly building materials.  The MR category addresses the materials that make up a huge portion of your house, and the vast majority of the finish-out materials. 

To determine the number of points we were eligible for in this category, we reviwed 21 groupings of materials to determine if the materials we are using are:

  1. recycled or reused
  2. had low emissions (low VOCs), and/or
  3. were locally produced

Points are potentially awarded for all three of these characteristics – so if you used wood flooring that you salvaged from a barn less than 500 miles away you get points in both the ‘recycled’ component and the ‘locally produced’ component.  We believe we’ll end up with the maximum number of points for this portion of the MR category.  We’re using materials such as 30% fly ash concrete, bamboo floors, FSC certified woods in our millwork, recycled oak hardwood floors (from the house we deconstructed), locally produced windows and window frames, locally produced cabinetry, low VOC everything, and we have 100% hard surface flooring (meaning no carpet in the entire house).  I’m going to highlight several of these materials in my later posts because we’ve done some really fun things with these products.  The LEED Environmentally Preferable Products chart on Page 80 of the LEED for Home Rating System document is very informative – although it looks scary when you first see it.  Take time to study it and ask me any questions you have. 

The MR LEED for Homes category also addresses the planning that goes into the framing of the house.  Obviously, the framing makes up the vast majority of the wood portion of the house, so LEED cares about whether you’ve planned appropriately and didn’t order too much wood or wasted too much wood in the building of your house.  As a prerequisite, you have to order no more than 10% in excess of what it will take to construct the house.  If you over-ordered more than 10% you’ve missed the prerequisite.  Extra points are received for having detailed framing documents (which we did thanks to the engineer and architect we hired), and for having a detailed cut list (which we had).

Framing efficiencies can get you 3 points.  There’s a chart on page 78 of the LEED for Homes Rating System that outlines 13 types of efficiencies that you can earn points for.  We are following these, some of which are often collectively called “advanced framing techniques”.

  • Stud spacing great then 16″ on center (we don’t have every single stud spaced greater than 16″, but the majority are)
  • Floor joist spacing greater than 16″ on center
  • Roof rafter spacing greater than 16″ on center
  • Size headers for actual loads
  • Use 2-stud corners (also known as California corners)

Why do we care about having greater than 16″ on center studs, joists and rafters?  As LEED puts it, “Reduced framing can reduce the number and size of thermal breaks and increase the amount of insulation installed, leading to better energy performance”.  And it clearly allows you to use less materials.

Waste Management is also addressed in this category.  You must have a construction waste management plan, and you can get extra points for limiting the waste.  I’ll again refer you to a table showing the amount of points you get (page 84 of the Rating System), but the idea is to send to the landfill or incinerator as little as possible.  Our wood waste is minimal because as you read in my post on the deconstruction of our old house, we are having our bare wood shredded to be used as mulch in our new landscape…so ZERO of it ends up in a landfill!

Materials & Resources expected points:  16 out of a possible 16.

01
November 11th, 2008 5:16 pm

Not bad… Not bad.

02
Cory
April 6th, 2009 10:05 am

FSC wood! Awesome! It is so nice to see more people really starting to care about sustainability and ‘green issues’! I got a great deal on FSC Lumber here at Lewis Lumber not long ago.

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